August 8

Visiting Chonnam University – Day 10

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Visiting Chonnam University – Day 10

Yesterday I arrived in Gwangju to revisit the sites of the historic Gwangju Uprising of 1980 against military rule. On my first day here, I followed the May 18 Road to see where and how the uprising started out of student protests at Chonnam University.

I wrote about it in detail at Kim Chi Bytes, one of the top South Korean blogs, where I am now a contributor. In part:

Chonnam National University is credited with being where the events of the Gwangju Uprising actually started, and it’s where the first May 15 Road trail starts. When the students arrived on the morning of May 18, the day after martial law was declared over the entire country, they were met with paratroopers and told the university was closed. Students across the country, along with about two dozen opposition lawmakers, including Gwangju local and future democratically-elected president Kim Dae-Jung. According to the May 18 Memorial Foundation, the paratroopers “unconditionally beat the students who were being observed in study in a library.”

As the news spread, more began coming to the university to resist martial law. By mid-morning, about 300-500 students had gathered by the gate in contrast to 30 paratroopers. Yoon Sang-won, then a student at Chonnam, writes that the students chanted, “Soldiers controlled by political commanders, return to your army post.” Other chants by the fifty students who sat down included, “End martial law!” and “Withdraw the order to close the universities!” according to Gwangju News.

The paratroopers warned, according to the account by Na Kahn-chae in South Korean Democracy: Legacy of the Gwangju Uprising, “If you do not return home immediately, you will be dispersed by force.” Students began throwing stones, and the paratroopers attacked. But the students were eventually able to move their protests throughout the city by the afternoon and march to the train station.

The spirit of student protest seems to be alive and well at Chonnam today. Banners hanging from trees voice opposition to THAAD, a missile defense system the government bought from the U.S., and support for students’ academic freedom.

Read the full post here: Visiting the Place Where the Gwangju Uprising Started

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About the Author

Mitchell Blatt is a travel writer, editor, and vlogger who has covered coronavirus in China, the impeachment of Park Geun-hye in Korea, and the Occupy Central protests in Hong Kong, among other things. He has been published in the South China Morning Post, USA Today, the Korea Times, The National Interest, The Daily Beast, and many other newspapers and websites. He blogs about his travels at AsitaTravelWriter.com. *********************************************************************************** Follow him on Facebook: Facebook - Mitchell Blatt, Asia Travel Writer************* Follow him on Twitter: Twitter - @MitchBlatt*************************************** Follow him on Instagram: Instagram - @MitchBlatt********************************** Subscribe to his videos on YouTube: YouTube

Mitchell Blatt

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